Failure

Originally published in Beat.

If you find someone who’s heard of Failure, chances are they’re young. Not juvenile young, but young enough to have only discovered the Californians in the intervening years between their disbandment in 1997 and their reunion in 2013. Failure enjoyed modest success in their initial run, releasing three underappreciated albums in a four-year span, but they barely made a blip on the commercial radar at the time.
Perhaps that was owing to the oddity of their sound – not quite space rock and not quite grunge, Failure utilised muddied guitars, swampy bass riffs, surreal lyricism and flourishes of sprawling, Pink Floyd-esque ambition, all infused with an off-kilter pop sensibility. After moderately successful Lollapalooza appearances, drug problems brought the band to a halt, and that was it. But as with so many of their contemporaries, the Internet – along with bands like A Perfect Circle and Paramore covering their songs – allowed a new generation to discover Failure’s music.

[…]

Advertisements

Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats

Originally published in Beat.

In case you missed it, doom is in vogue. In recent years, Yob emerged from a 15 year hiatus only to be thrust into Rolling Stone and The New York Times; Pallbearer were championed as timeless almost the moment they came out of the gates; and legions of listeners are salivating over Black Sabbath’s upcoming last hurrah. So why is the world so interested in slow, devilish tempos and subsonic riffs almost a half-century after Sabbath and the like introduced those sounds to the world? Even the musicians themselves struggle with this question.
“I’m really not sure,” says Kevin Starrs, otherwise known as the eponymous Uncle of UK quartet Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats. “I can’t put my finger on it. I really don’t know where it comes from, because it just seems like it’s such a sudden thing. I wish I knew. I’ve just got no idea how it all happened.”

[…]